Exhibitions

Plamen Dejanoff

October 1 - December 30, 2011

 Plamen Dejanoff, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein Hamburg
Plamen Dejanoff, The Bronze House, 2010/11, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, The Bronze House (alloying, II – XXI), 2010/11, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, The Bronze House (B&GG), 2011, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, Planets of Comparison (lights), 2010, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein Hamburg Plamen Dejanoff, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, The Bronze House (facade elements), 2011, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgPlamen Dejanoff, Planets of Comparison, 2011, Installationsansicht Kunstverein Hamburg, 2011, Foto / photo: Fred Dott, Kunstverein HamburgInstallationsansicht / installation view, Künstler im Fokus #9: Plamen Dejanoff. Heads & Tails, MAK Wien, 2010, Foto / photo: Wolfgang Woessner/MAK

In his work, the artist Plamen Dejanoff often uses marketing strategies from related fields and creates desire by means of sleek and glossy surfaces and stage-setting principles borrowed from the world of consumerism. His approach to these strategies that are apparently foreign to art is a friendly one and can be tied to a lineage that includes artists like Andy Warhol—who must surely be considered the trailblazer—and Jeff Koons. He is, in fact, closer to the latter, as far as the creation of objects and the treatment and handling of their fetishistic character is concerned. Dejanoff is among the artists who deliberately adopt consumerism, economics, media marketing and comprehensive network strategies. He uses their principles and potential to pursue his own goals, but without turning them into their opposite. Instead, his work is informed by a great trust in art, because he does not need to isolate it from other social and economic processes. It can confidently take its place in their midst. Dejanoff’s is an art of action that tries out new ways and possibilities. Affirmative, and all the more effective, revolutions come to light in his work. His projects are often long-term and cannot be looked at outside of the "Dejanoff System."

In the last analysis, however, it is about creating sculptures that involve all these aspects: including the corresponding financing, publicity and support. The Kunstverein in Hamburg, whose spacious hall and two floors of galleries offer ideal conditions, will show parts of "The Bronze House" as a walk-in sculpture, accompanied by objects and drawings by Donald Judd, Gordon Matta-Clark and Le Corbusier.